BRIGHT COTTAGE ACUPUNCTURE

A modern door
to ageless healing

Philosophy

Our philosophy is to bring our combined eighty years of practice to your health issues with an antique style of treatment approach that is steeped in the traditions of the early Han Dynasty of China.

‘A modern door to ageless healing’ is a play of words on how a system of health care devised over 2,000 years ago is still relevant in outcome and language to the majority of modern health issues. We hope the clinic environment and our attention to harmony will enable a gentle and effective experience for all.

Philosophy

Our philosophy is to bring our combined eighty years of practice to your health issues with an antique style of treatment approach that is steeped in the traditions of the early Han Dynasty of China.

‘A modern door to ageless healing’ is a play of words on how a system of health care devised over 2,000 years ago is still relevant in outcome and language to the majority of modern health issues. We hope the clinic environment and our attention to harmony will enable a gentle and effective experience for all.

Clinic

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There are six treatment rooms and three waiting rooms to facilitate social distancing.

Clinic

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There are six treatment rooms and three waiting rooms to facilitate social distancing.

Story

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How many great skills have been lost? How many things of value have been forgotten? Old men with their chisels. Young apprentices with their aprons. Master and student, teacher and pupil. Nowadays, we produce computer engineers, and young financial wizards, game theorists and social media giants, and in the crucible of modern science, everything from cosmology to physics, from medicine to psychology, is superseding and surpassing multitudes of explanations from history. And so many things, little things, old things, long-forgotten things, are retreating further and further into the archives of history.

There is a richness of story at acupuncture’s beginning, and a way-of- life in its pre-dawn history, that has been lost and obscured by multiple translations and eventually discarded by the science of modernisation. The refinements of modern acupuncture have corrected many of the contradictory explanations, styles, and approaches from the history of past texts, but in its desire to modernise acupuncture to be more suitable for the contemporary teaching institutions, there has been a significant move away from its original more poetic beginnings.

This is our attempt to breath some life into the old masters texts from so long ago.

Story

……….

How many great skills have been lost? How many things of value have been forgotten? Old men with their chisels. Young apprentices with their aprons. Master and student, teacher and pupil. Nowadays, we produce computer engineers, and young financial wizards, game theorists and social media giants, and in the crucible of modern science, everything from cosmology to physics, from medicine to psychology, is superseding and surpassing multitudes of explanations from history. And so many things, little things, old things, long-forgotten things, are retreating further and further into the archives of history.

There is a richness of story at acupuncture’s beginning, and a way-of- life in its pre-dawn history, that has been lost and obscured by multiple translations and eventually discarded by the science of modernisation. The refinements of modern acupuncture have corrected many of the contradictory explanations, styles, and approaches from the history of past texts, but in its desire to modernise acupuncture to be more suitable for the contemporary teaching institutions, there has been a significant move away from its original more poetic beginnings.

This is our attempt to breath some life into the old masters texts from so long ago.

About

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About

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Ross Penman

Dip Ac. Member AACMA. AHPRA.
Acupuncturist

I’ve spent the last forty years working with a group of like-minded scholars translating the ‘Yellow Emperor’s Inner Classic’ (Huangdi Neijing) written sometime between the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. These magnificent texts are the cornerstone of all traditional Chinese healing. Practically without a single exception, every line of Chinese medical practice will proclaim its descendance from and allegiance to the Neijing (as it’s most commonly known) and will flourish this as its seal of authenticity. But in reality, the greatest part of this is tokenism. Few practices are truly grounded in this difficult, confusing, sparse and poetic line. The necessary discipline of it is almost monastic in its simplicity. While so many claim its lineage, most regard its reality as too constricting.

Ironically, the Chinese have a saying for this sort of thing. ‘Yè gong hào lóng’: ‘Lord Yè loves dragons’.

This is based on a story in a Han dynasty text, Xinyu by Liu Xiang (200BCE).

‘Lord Ye was a dragon enthusiast, and he painted or carved the great and mysterious creatures everywhere he could. The walls of his house were painted with them, and the beams and pillars, doors and windows were all carved with them. As a result, word of his love for dragons spread. One day, a real dragon residing in the heavens heard of Duke Ye, and decided to fly down to see him. When the dragon landed, accompanied by thunder and lightning, his huge body filled the palace yard. His head came crashing through the window at the front, while his tail came sweeping through another in the back wall. At the sight of this, Duke Ye was terrified out of his wits and fled in horror.

In light of this, it’s clear that what Duke Ye loved was not dragons, but the likeness of dragons’.

In comparison, the dragon of Neijing is scary and overpowering. Reading, studying and understanding the Neijing is just such an enormous endeavour. The temptation is to run and hide with Lord Yè. In my attempt to harness and ride the dragon of Neijing I have had to immerse myself in the theoretical sands, courtyards and pillars of the Neijing world. In the spirit of this challenge, I have eliminated all theories and practices that were developed after the end of the Han Dynasty (206BCE- 220 AD).

It is easy to love the image of classical acupuncture, but another thing entirely to practise it wholeheartedly.

I have coined the term ‘Han Acumoxa’ to describe the style of acupuncture that I practice. The style has subtle and poetic interpretations of the workings of the physical and metaphysical aspects of the organs and psyche. This old-speak language captures the imagination in ways that makes accessible an organic picture of how the organs and mind interact that is simple to comprehend and at the same time is wonderfully profound. And endlessly versatile. And unfailingly practical.

Ross Penman

Dip Ac. Member AACMA. AHPRA.
Acupuncturist

I’ve spent the last forty years working with a group of like-minded scholars translating the ‘Yellow Emperor’s Inner Classic’ (Huangdi Neijing) written sometime between the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. These magnificent texts are the cornerstone of all traditional Chinese healing. Practically without a single exception, every line of Chinese medical practice will proclaim its descendance from and allegiance to the Neijing (as it’s most commonly known) and will flourish this as its seal of authenticity.

But in reality, the greatest part of this is tokenism. Few practices are truly grounded in this difficult, confusing, sparse and poetic line. The necessary discipline of it is almost monastic in its simplicity. While so many claim its lineage, most regard its reality as too constricting.

Ironically, the Chinese
have a saying for this sort of thing.
‘Yè gong hào lóng’: ‘Lord Yè loves dragons’.

This is based on a story in a Han dynasty text, Xinyu by Liu Xiang (200BCE).

‘Lord Ye was a dragon enthusiast, and he painted or carved the great and mysterious creatures everywhere he could. The walls of his house were painted with them, and the beams and pillars, doors and windows were all carved with them. As a result, word of his love for dragons spread. One day, a real dragon residing in the heavens heard of Duke Ye, and decided to fly down to see him. When the dragon landed, accompanied by thunder and lightning, his huge body filled the palace yard. His head came crashing through the window at the front, while his tail came sweeping through another in the back wall. At the sight of this, Duke Ye was terrified out of his wits and fled in horror.

In light of this, it’s clear that what Duke Ye loved was not dragons, but the likeness of dragons’.

In comparison, the dragon of Neijing is scary and overpowering. Reading, studying and understanding the Neijing is just such an enormous endeavour. The temptation is to run and hide with Lord Yè. In my attempt to harness and ride the dragon of Neijing I have had to immerse myself in the theoretical sands, courtyards and pillars of the Neijing world. In the spirit of this challenge, I have eliminated all theories and practices that were developed after the end of the Han Dynasty (206BCE- 220 AD).

It is easy to love the image of classical acupuncture, but another thing entirely to practise it wholeheartedly.

I have coined the term ‘Han Acumoxa’ to describe the style of acupuncture that I practice. The style has subtle and poetic interpretations of the workings of the physical and metaphysical aspects of the organs and psyche. This old-speak language captures the imagination in ways that makes accessible an organic picture of how the organs and mind interact that is simple to comprehend and at the same time is wonderfully profound. And endlessly versatile. And unfailingly practical.

Andrew Macfarlane

Acupuncturist & Osteopath
DO, DC, Dip Ac
Member  ATMS. CA. AHPRA

I was drawn into practice through the love of the body’s mechanics that lead me initially to become a Doctor of Chiropractic and Doctor of Osteopathy in 1983.

I soon started to realise that total body wellness was more complex that just its mechanics and therefore it was critical to use a more holistic approach.

I have trained in number of other modalities, yet acupuncture and osteopathy seem to be my calling and allow me to understand and treat the idea of a total body balance.

I completed my initial training in acupuncture courses in both Australia and China in 1985, witnessing its wonder in treating complicated health issues in a simplified holistic approach.

During the following years whilst practicing I started and operated one of Sydney’s first Holistic medical centres in North Sydney and continued to explore my multi levelled approach to health. It was during these years I developed a strong professional relationship with Ross Penman.

Ross and I shared ideas, approaches, and skill sets for years and this bond of interest eventually developed into us creating the Bright Cottage Acupuncture clinic in 2008.

The Neijing texts and practices were brought to life in our shared friendship and we both feel blessed to have found a common flame of passion for this antique world of Chinese medicine.

Andrew Macfarlane

Acupuncturist & Osteopath
DO, DC, Dip Ac
Member  ATMS. CA. AHPRA

I was drawn into practice through the love of the body’s mechanics that lead me initially to become a Doctor of Chiropractic and Doctor of Osteopathy in 1983.

I soon started to realise that total body wellness was more complex that just its mechanics and therefore it was critical to use a more holistic approach.

I have trained in number of other modalities, yet acupuncture and osteopathy seem to be my calling and allow me to understand and treat the idea of a total body balance.

I completed my initial training in acupuncture courses in both Australia and China in 1985, witnessing its wonder in treating complicated health issues in a simplified holistic approach.

During the following years whilst practicing I started and operated one of Sydney’s first Holistic medical centres in North Sydney and continued to explore my multi levelled approach to health. It was during these years I developed a strong professional relationship with Ross Penman.

Ross and I shared ideas, approaches, and skill sets for years and this bond of interest eventually developed into us creating the Bright Cottage Acupuncture clinic in 2008.

The Neijing texts and practices were brought to life in our shared friendship and we both feel blessed to have found a common flame of passion for this antique world of Chinese medicine.

Contact

BRIGHT COTTAGE ACUPUNCTURE
40 Yeo Street, Suite 106, First floor
Neutral Bay NSW 2098
P: 9909 2409
E: [email protected]

Please note that we prefer to take appointments over the phone rather than via email or online as this enables a more personal interaction designed to facilitate individual requirements and needs.

Parking is available in the vicinity in various locations. Close to public transport.

BRIGHT COTTAGE ACUPUNCTURE
40 Yeo Street, Suite 106, Neutral Bay NSW 2098

BRIGHT COTTAGE ACUPUNCTURE
40 Yeo Street, Suite 106
Neutral Bay NSW 2098